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The Shuler Theater

The Shuler Theater

The historic Shuler Theater in downtown Raton, New Mexico, is a state landmark and remains the center for performing arts in northeastern New Mexico.

The theater is owned and maintained by the City of Raton, New Mexico, and may be reserved for functions or performances by contacting the Shuler offices at 575-445-4746.


El Raton Movie Theater

El Raton Movie Theater

First run movies are still shown at El Raton!


Brief History
Taken from a "Cinema Treasures" Article

This little theatre is a gem.

Constructed as an Atmospheric style theatre, in the style of a medieval Spanish castle, the building was designed by the Albuquerque, New Mexico, architectural firm George Williamson, Inc. It was built for the partnership of Dr. L.A. Hubbard and Thomas F. Murphy. The cost of the theatre was reported to have been approximately $100,000. Construction began on July 15, 1929 and was completed for its grand opening on April 20, 1930. The inaugural movie was a Warner Brothers sound picture in natural color; “Song of the West” starring John Boles and Joe E. Brown.
The exterior facade has turrets, battlements and other appropriate decorations befitting a Spanish castle in the Gothic style of architecture. There are two storefronts located on each side of the main entrance to the theatre. The auditorium and balcony contained a total of approximately 520 seats.

The Spanish castle motif was reflected throughout the interior of the building. Surrounding the auditorium’s movie screen it resembles the theatre’s facade of an ancient castle. The audience were made to feel as if they were seated in a courtyard with the side-walls painted in a floral design, resemble vines growing over an old Spanish structure. The murals and designs were painted by the noted artist J. Charles Scnoor, grandson of Baron Jacob Carlzevalt Von Schnoor who was knighted by King Ludwig of Bavaria for his work in illustrating the German bible.
Contact Us
115 North 2nd Steet
Raton, NM 87740
575-445-7008
The Raton Evening Gazette for April 18, 1930, reported that the ceiling was painted in a “….soft deep blue of the southern sky, studded with many twinkling stars, and here and there, (clouds) floating leisurely across the arched expanse are so real that we can hardly believe we are surrounded by four walls and a roof.” The side-wall murals were painted over sometime in the past (possibly in the late-1940’s when some remodeling was done by architectural firm Brittelle, Ginner & Neuner) and the ceiling’s stars and clouds have also disappeared.

In August 2006, the theatre was listed on the New Mexico State Register of Cultural Properties. On January 17, 2007, the theatre was listed on the National Register of Historic Properties.

In April 2008, three Raton couples, Traci and Ted Kamp, Kerry and Kristie Medina and Donna and Neil Emiro purchased the theatre.

 


Raton Parks & Recreation Department

Raton Parks & Recreation Department

One of the star features of the local parks and rec scene is the aquatic center.

The Raton Regional Aquatic Center features:

  • Kiddie Pool with slide
  • Tunnel Slide
  • Diving board
  • Aqua climbing wall
  • Volleyball net and basketball hoop
  • Whirlpool
  • Variety of other water features


Sugarite Canyon State Park

Sugarite Canyon State Park

Sugarite Canyon (pronounced “shug-ur-eet”) is located east of Raton Pass in a sparsely-populated region of lofty, steep-sided, flat-topped mesas; cone-shaped volcanoes; and old lava flows. Sugarite Canyon State Park, 3,600 acres (15 km2) in size, consists of a stream valley flanked by basalt cliffs with Bartlett and Little Horse Mesas to the west and Horse Mesa on the east. Elevations in the park are from 6,950 feet (2,120 m) at the park entrance to 8,350 feet (2,550 m) on top of Little Horse Mesa. The park is about 4 miles (6.4 km) long and 1.5 miles (2.4 km) wide.[2]

Most of the park is heavily forested with ponderosa pine and gambel oak forests. Along Chicorica Creek at lower elevations is a riparian forest of willow and cottonwood. Douglas fir, white fir, and aspen forests are found at higher elevations on north facing slopes. The flat top of Little Horse Mesa is a grassy meadow. Wildlife species in the park include mule deer, black bear, mountain lion, turkeys, and elk. The two artificial lakes in the park, Lake Maloya (120 acres) and Lake Alice (3 acres) are stocked with rainbow and brown trout. Abundant butterflies, wildflowers, and views down the Sugarite Valley to the Great Plains far below are highlights of the park.[1]


Goat Hill Scenic Overlook

Goat Hill Scenic Overlook

It's a bumpy ride up to Goat Hill, but worth the trip. From atop the hill, you get wonderful views of the city of Raton, and the mountains and plains beyond.


Capulin Volcano National Monument

Capulin Volcano National Monument

Come view a dramatic landscape—a unique place of mountains, plains, and sky. Born of fire and forces continually reshaping the earth’s surface, Capulin Volcano provides access to nature’s most awe-inspiring work.

 

Capulin Volcano has been the Sentinel of the Plains for 60,000 years. Standing watch over the history of the area from Folsom Man to Today.

The dynamic landscape allows numerous plants and animals to live around the volcano. Learn more about who calls Capulin home.


Marshall the Pit Bull

Marshall the Pit Bull

Marshall is our resident celebrity. Adopted from Orlando Bully Rescue in Orlando FL, he has gone from being a neglected pup to a car show sensation. He has also had some pretty sweet modeling gigs with top pin ups. Ask for Marshall--he loves attention!